My guess is that with a string format you can access the nth character of the message by its position, which can be very difficult to do with a list if the encoding support different size for different characters (and sometimes the same character can have different encoding depending of previous ones: contextual encoding) ... I guess the string type abstract all that, but list is enough encoding like ASCII, UTF8. So two questions: (1) am I clear? (2) if yes, am I right? ;)
<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 1/17/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Robert Virding</b> <<a href="mailto:robert.virding@telia.com">robert.virding@telia.com</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
We do actually, in fact we have something much much better, a list.<br>Using a list you don't have to worry about encodings but can use the<br>unicode value directly in the string/list. This makes all processing<br>much easier. Then when you are done you can convert it to what ever
<br>encoding you want.<br><br>I don't really understand why anyone would want to process data in an<br>unnecessarily complex format instead of a simple one.<br><br>Robert<br><br>dda wrote:<br>> String types  at least well-implemented ones  don't just store a
<br>> string, but also encoding information. They are/should be geared<br>> towards pain-free manipulation of text data, and by text I mean things<br>> outside ASCII-land. Encodings-aware string manipulation functions
<br>> don't function on bytes, but on characters, a quite different notion.<br>> We don't have this in Erlang.<br>><br>_______________________________________________<br>erlang-questions mailing list<br><a href="mailto:erlang-questions@erlang.org">
erlang-questions@erlang.org</a><br><a href="http://www.erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions">http://www.erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions</a><br></blockquote></div><br>