[erlang-questions] erlang 21

Fred Youhanaie <>
Sun Jul 8 14:47:23 CEST 2018


I don't have windows installation, so can't comment on that side.

However, the man page for erl says:

	"Notice also that Ctrl-Break is used instead of Ctrl-C on Windows."

Does Ctrl-Break work for you?

Cheers,
Fred

On 07/07/18 22:18, Sam Overdorf wrote:
> I'm running windows 7 professional.
> 
> It works fine with otp-20 and older versions (I still use 20.3) so
> something has been changed..
> if I run "erl +Bc" then control-c works just fine.
> Is there a configuration file for :"erl" that I can add this flag to
> to make it work the old way?
> I use control-c all of the time.
> 
> Thanks,
> Sam
> 
> On Sat, Jul 7, 2018 at 5:28 AM, Fred Youhanaie <> wrote:
>> I'll just add to all the good advice so far that "erl +Bi" will disable
>> Ctrl-C.
>>
>> That might be the source of Sam's issue.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Fred
>>
>>
>> On 07/07/18 12:12,  wrote:
>>>
>>> Those usability improvements have already been made:
>>>
>>>     ^G
>>> Gets you to JCL mode. All Erlangers should be familiar with this. If
>>> you're
>>> not, then read up on it and play around. Not much to learn.
>>>
>>>     restricted shell
>>> This is the real life saver: picking what commands are allowed to be run
>>> by
>>> a user. This gives you a LOT more flexibility and than merely making
>>> things
>>> like q() and exit() more special than they already are.
>>>
>>>     customized shell over SSH
>>> Even more freedom than a restricted shell definition. You can write some
>>> really awesome remote tools this way (or an entire MUD interface...).
>>>
>>> halt() and init:stop() are system calls and really shouldn't be the
>>> subject
>>> of any human's habit-forming behaviors.
>>>
>>> IMO this is a case of the humans ignoring the tools that have been made
>>> available -- making similar things available under different names is not
>>> likely to help.
>>>
>>> -Craig
>>>
>>>
>>> On 2018年7月7日土曜日 13時03分04秒 JST you wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I would say there is a clear usability flaw here. The shell should be
>>>> smart
>>>> enough to distinguish which command was typed (^G, ^C or q() or exit() or
>>>> init:stop() or halt()) and whether there is a remote shell active. What
>>>> it
>>>> would do is to ask user what is his intent or somehow confirm that remote
>>>> shell is active and REMOTE VM will now quit.
>>>>
>>>> If the shell isn't that smart, there's a great improvement waiting to
>>>> happen.
>>>>
>>>> 2018-07-07 12:59 GMT+02:00 <>:
>>>>
>>>>> A quick anecdote...
>>>>>
>>>>> I and a lot of people on my team used to habitually halt() to exit.
>>>>>
>>>>> Then one day someone abruptly shut down a remote node they were
>>>>> connected
>>>>> to because, well, they had that habit.
>>>>>
>>>>> ^G is a safer habit to form and reminds you where you are at when you
>>>>> hit
>>>>> it, whether connected to a remote node from a local erl shell (want
>>>>> 'q'),
>>>>> or via SSH (want 'exit()').
>>>>>
>>>>> -Craig
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> erlang-questions mailing list
>>>>> 
>>>>> http://erlang.org/mailman/listinfo/erlang-questions
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
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>>> 
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