[erlang-questions] Light-weight operating systems supporting Erlang in production web servers

Steve Rogers <>
Thu Sep 21 21:37:45 CEST 2017


Great, thanks for the update!

On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 2:29 PM Peer Stritzinger <>
wrote:

> Hi Steve,
>
> On 21.09.2017, at 21:16, Steve Rogers <> wrote:
>
> So when can we expect to get our hands on a GRiSP board/
>
>
> This week we finalized the hardware for production.  From now there is a
> minimum of 8 weeks production time
> if there is delivery time on crucial parts possibly a bit longer, waiting
> for the schedule from the manufacturer.
>
> So hoping to ship mid November.
>
> Definitely in time for Christmas season ;-)
>
> There is a newsletter subscription on the bottom of https://www.grisp.org
> will post details of producing the first batch there.
>
> Best,
> -- Peer
>
> # Steve
>
> On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 10:29 AM Peer Stritzinger <>
> wrote:
>
>> On 21.09.2017, at 12:23, Jesper Louis Andersen <
>> > wrote:
>>
>> On Wed, Sep 20, 2017 at 12:50 AM Richard A. O'Keefe <>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> One question.  I can get a
>>> "Raspberry Pi 3 Model B with 1.2GHz 64-bit Quad Core and 1GB Ram"
>>> for NZD 69 including tax and run Erlang on it.
>>> (Hmm.  Next time I have some spare cash I must get one...)
>>>
>>> Why would I pay NZD300 for a 300MHz board with 64MB of memory?
>>>
>>>
>> My prediction is that eventually we'll see the "small embedded" market
>> squeezed down by rather cheap powerful devices such as the rPI. My argument
>> for this prediction hinges on power becoming free in the future (due to the
>> current massive advances in solar and wind energy on top of better
>> batteries).
>>
>>
>> Small embedded being current rPI *sized* CPUs for some definition of
>> small will be happening.  Except rPI is not usable in production for
>> several reasons (supply, quality, hardware changing beyond your control).
>>
>> Currently, the power draw of the stronger chips is too high and
>> production at scale means that shaving off a few cents here and there is
>> worth it.
>>
>>
>> Exactly. We have a few industrial applications where we would love to get
>> a larger CPU but we can’t because of price and power (meaning in this case
>> thermal energy output).
>>
>> But it looks like the price tag of a 1.2 GHZ 64 bit chip is only going
>> one way, and this makes the added development effort of targeting a smaller
>> chip more expensive. In turn, you need an even bigger scale of production.
>> And so on.
>>
>>
>> Except that with a 300MHz Cortex M7 size CPU you can do lots of
>> interesting applications just in Erlang already and save the costs.
>>
>> GRiSP is interesting because it can offer you a far faster time to market
>> and lower development effort at the same or better robustness/resilience.
>> You can thus get the lower production costs while amortizing development
>> effort better. It is a good bet until the niche squeeze I predict above
>> happens.
>>
>>
>> Thanks :-)
>>
>> Also we plan not to be squeezed but adapt.  One size which is just
>> getting viable with Erlang are the automotive controllers with flash and
>> ram on the CPU only (for the automotive industry any external memory is too
>> unreliable and a problem for EMC).  Thats one direction what I want to
>> target with the GRiSP software stack.
>>
>> We could have easily also targeted a 24 core communication controller
>> with 16 times Gbit I/O which is a tempting target also and noone would
>> complain about the compute power there ;-)
>>
>> For the GRiSP-base we just tried to pick the right sized board for
>> today.  Others might follow…
>>
>> Best,
>> -- Peer
>>
>>
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