[erlang-questions] The quest for the perfect programming language for massive concurrency.

Fredrik Andersson <>
Tue Feb 4 10:56:03 CET 2014


This whole search discussion reminded me of
http://www.haskell.org/hoogle/which is a search engine for Haskell
code that takes type information into
consideration as well.

Seeing something similar integrated into erldocs would be nice.


On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 10:50 AM, Vlad Dumitrescu <> wrote:

> Hi Joe,
>
> On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 10:29 AM, Joe Armstrong <> wrote:
>
>> I'd like to see two windows.
>>
>> In window one I type my program. There is a single button under the
>> window.
>> The button has an icon of Sherlock Holmes on it.
>>
>> I press the Sherlock button.
>>
>> Sherlock analyses my text fragment comparing it to all the programs in
>> the entire universe
>> that have ever been written - in the second window it says
>> "this program is very similar to ..." or "this is a new idea ..."
>> "did you know that XXX is working on this at this very moment ..."
>>
>> I've experiment with this is several forms - I want to find "the most
>> similar thing to
>> the given thing" - this is an extremely difficult problem.
>>
>
> Well there is such a thing, kind of. I don't know how well it works in
> practice. It's called Code Recommenders and they have a database gathered
> from available repositories of code that is used to suggest what to write
> next base on what others do after code similar to the one already in the
> editor. It's Java only and for the kind of code that is needed to write
> Java UI (repetitive and with a lot of boilerplate) it works ok. For
> "normal" code it's less useful, of course.
>
>
>> One day IDEs might help me think - I think some kind of synergy between
>> a text editor, a search engine and a IRC thingy would be good.
>>
>
> Yes, that's the idea.
>
>
>> IRC is great - if I knew who to talk to and where they hang out.
>>
>
> Hmm, so one would advertise topics of interest and get suggestions for
> matching people and which rooms thay are in?
>
>
>> Computers should serve our needs - not like it is today where we serve
>> their needs.
>>
>
> I think that very few engineers do this on purpose, but this world's
> current economy, there is no incentive for a business to make a perfect
> product that will require no maintenance and will last forever. So we do
> the least viable thing that gets us on the market and keeps us there. Who
> cares that in the end the cost and amount of effort are much larger?
>
> regards,
> Vlad
>
> /Joe
>>
>>
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