Language Bindings for Erlang Again

Mickael Remond <>
Wed Jun 7 22:32:00 CEST 2006


* Michel Urvoy <> [2006-06-06 08:18:14 +0200]:

> I've no doubt about this. The point I had already noticed with Nortel
> is that Erlang is mentioned nowhere.
> The company that use or have used Erlang are very discret about the
> language. Even with an open source project like process one /
> ejabberd:
> http://www.process-one.net/en/projects/ejabberd/

You have to look carefully:
- Erlang support:
  http://www.process-one.net/en/services/support/erlang.html
- Erlang contribs and docs:
  http://support.process-one.net/doc/display/CONTRIBS/Contributions
  http://support.process-one.net/doc/display/ERL/Erlang+area
- Erlang Packaging (Something that aims at becoming the CPAN for
  Erlang):
  http://erlrt.process-one.net/?page=index
  
But, most of the time you should not mix messages that are intended to
different kind of people on the same explaination.
That's counter-productive.

And seeming to be "secret" about the technology used has one advantage:
People start thinking it might be a powerfull secret weapon they should
adopt.
I like to think of this as a marketing strategy for Erlang. The idea is
taken from Parmentier who introduced the Potato in France:
>From http://www.menumagazine.co.uk/book/azpotato.htm :

 "However, the French were less than enamoured of this ugly,
 unprepossessing tuber and resisted strongly. Feelings against the potato
 were so high that a rumour even existed that it would cause leprosy. So
 Parmentier indulged in a little reverse psychology; gaining permission
 from Louis XVI to plant a small field of potatoes just outside Paris, he
 posted a very conspicuous guard. This was enough to pique the interest
 of the contrary French temperament with Parisians, who had initially
 turned up their noses at the tuber, plundering the crop and giving the
 potato a new-found ‘chic’. To reinforce this new growing popularity, M.
 Parmentier demonstrated a genius for marketing that many modern
 companies would envy in organizing a royal banquet, at which every
 course contained potatoes in some form and the Royal couple wore potato
 flowers, his name gaining synonymity with the potato for posterity in
 France."

Nice, isn't it ?

-- 
Mickaël Rémond
 http://www.process-one.net/



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