Erlang on Solaris x86

ke han <>
Wed Aug 30 14:36:15 CEST 2006


On Aug 30, 2006, at 6:23 PM, Joel Reymont wrote:

>
> On Aug 30, 2006, at 11:12 AM, ke han wrote:
>
>> Others have posted their testing results with the Niagra chip and  
>> erlang R11.  The results I've seen so far look _very_ good.
>
> I must have missed the posts. Where are they?

Joe Armstrong's post:
http://www.erlang.org/ml-archive/erlang-questions/200606/msg00187.html

I'm pretty sure one or two others had posted some results but I can't  
find them right now...


>
>> The very nice thing about what TextDrive is offering for their  
>> Opteron Solaris Containers is that you get the entire fault- 
>> tolerant infrastructure with it.  Your renting a container, not a  
>> virtual machine on a particular server.
>
> I'm not sure I understand the difference between a container and a  
> VM. What is the fault-tolerant infrastructure and how do you get it  
> at TextDrive?

A VM is a complete guest OS running on top of another host OS (either  
a general purpose host or a special purpose one just for hosting  
guest VMs).  A Container/Zone (which is a Solaris-only animal) shares  
the same OS for all containers/zones on the same physical server..   
Solaris has lots of built in tricks to partition or contain the  
resources inside your zone.

Its my understanding that TextDrive is selling a container and  
guarantees that your container is always up.  So if the physical  
server goes down, your container runs on another server (your data is  
on a shared SAN in their model).  These kinds of tricks can be done  
with virtualization systems such as Xen or VMware.  The trade off is  
in standardizing on the strength of managing one OS (Solaris) for  
everything vs. being OS agnostic and letting each VM be any OS.  For  
a "full service" hosting provider, it makes sense to be a master of  
one OS than to supply only a rented resource for a customer to  
choose  their own VM.  Less OS choice, but possibly much better  
managed and refined solution...which is where the better profit  
margins are.

ke han

>
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> http://wagerlabs.com/
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