tracing function call arguments, was Re: erlang trace tutorial

Gerd Flaig <>
Sat Oct 23 15:46:00 CEST 2004


Gerd Flaig <> writes:

> [...] This gives me a nice trace indeed
>
>    (<0.32.0>) call t1:a/1
>    (<0.32.0>) call t1:b/1
>    (<0.32.0>) returned from t1:b/1 -> {foo,foo}
>    (<0.32.0>) returned from t1:a/1 -> {foo,foo}
>    (<0.32.0>) returning to t1:r/0
>    (<0.32.0>) call t1:a/1
>    (<0.32.0>) call t1:b/1
>    (<0.32.0>) returned from t1:b/1 -> {bar,bar}
>    (<0.32.0>) returned from t1:a/1 -> {bar,bar}
>    (<0.32.0>) returning to t1:r/0
>    (<0.32.0>) call t1:b/1
>    (<0.32.0>) returned from t1:b/1 -> {baz,baz}
>    (<0.32.0>) returning to t1:r/0
>
> but no arguments. Is there a way to get the arguments?

interesting. After restarting the node, I got

    (<0.541.0>) call t1:a(foo)
    (<0.541.0>) call t1:b(foo)
    (<0.541.0>) returned from t1:b/1 -> {foo,foo}
    (<0.541.0>) returned from t1:a/1 -> {foo,foo}
    (<0.541.0>) call t1:a(bar)
    (<0.541.0>) call t1:b(bar)
    (<0.541.0>) returned from t1:b/1 -> {bar,bar}
    (<0.541.0>) returned from t1:a/1 -> {bar,bar}
    (<0.541.0>) call t1:b(baz)
    (<0.541.0>) returned from t1:b/1 -> {baz,baz}

which is what I wanted. Strange effect, maybe I confused the trace
facility with my previous attempts?

       Goodbyte, Gerd.
-- 
Gerd Flaig                     Technik                
Bei Schlund + Partner AG       Brauerstraße 48      D-76135 Karlsruhe
 Physics is like sex: sure, it may give some practical results,
 but that's not why we do it. -- Richard Feynman



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